BECOME A CANSI INSTRUCTOR

HOW TO BECOME AN INSTRUCTOR

CANSI is the national association for the training and certification of cross country and telemark ski instructors in Canada. Anyone over the age of 15 who would like to become a ski instructor can attend a Level I course in either discipline. CANSI offers a number of certification levels so that members can progress through to develop their skiing, skill analysis and teaching skills. We also offer a number of other skill improvement and social events to our members.

Our courses are designed for individuals who want to become certified ski instructors and for certified members who want to advance their development. Our courses focus on the development of skills in ski demonstration and performance skiing, skill analysis and effective teaching approaches for different learning needs and skiing abilities.

Grow your skills! Challenge your abilities! Help others to enjoy the sport of skiing!
That is what a CANSI instructor does.

How to get started:

1. Select your discipline Cross Country OR Telemark

2. Review the Level I Course Outlines to ensure you know what is expected in the course

3. Select your region to locate courses in your area.

4. Select a course to register.

BENEFITS OF BEING A CANSI INSTRUCTOR

Refresher Courses: For members who wish to maintain their professional membership status. These courses provide updates on changes in ski technique, skill analysis and teaching approaches.

Preparation Courses: For members who are considering taking the next level of certification. Pre courses provide information on ski technique, teaching, skill analysis and the testing criteria for the next level of certification. Participants receive feedback on areas to focus on to meet certification course expectations.

Skill Improvement Workshops: For members who would like to participate in skill development with other CANSI members.

Social Events: Provide social activities with other CANSI members. The focus is on social interaction and fun.

Pro Deal Program:  Selected equipment and clothing manufacturers/distributors provide discounts to our members.

On-lineTechnical and Teaching Resources: Articles, technical documents and videos on the latest on ski techniques, skill analysis, teaching and waxing.

Scholarship Programs: Financial support to continue to grow your skills, knowledge and certification.

Monthly Communication (October to April): Technical information, national news, course and event offerings, regional and member news.

Job Posting: Ability to market your services to those looking to hire an instructor.

Equipment For Sale: Ability to post equipment, clothing, wax and other nordic items to

Liability Insurance Coverage (available to Professional Members): Members who maintain a professional membership receive coverage under our insurance policy for teaching skiing in Canada according to CANSI standards.

To maintain an active member status, members must pay their membership dues each year and attend a refresher course (free) every three years.

Ski Disciplines

Nordic skiing refers to the sport and recreation of skiing on skis that have free-heel bindings. This includes the olympic winter sports of cross country skiing (XC skiing), ski jumping, and nordic combined, as well as two back-country skiing styles called telemark skiing and ski touring.

CANSI focuses on the development and certification of ski instructors for cross country and telemark skiers. Other Canadian associations provide expertise in ski jumping, nordic combined and back-country or ski touring.

Cross country Skiing

Cross country skiing has evolved from its origin as a way of moving from place to place in winter into a very demanding Olympic sport that now is separated into two main styles of skiing: classic and skate (also known as freestyle).

Classic style of skiing refers to cross country skiing where the power to move forward comes mainly from pushing down on one ski and gripping it to the snow, then transferring the body forward and over the other, gliding ski in quick, alternating motions.

Skating refers to cross country skiing where the power to move forward comes mainly from pushing sideways on an edge of one ski and then another ski, while both skis are continuously gliding. This style of skiing is similar to ice (hockey/speed) skating.

Criteria for CANSI XC Level I

Telemark Skiing

Telemark skiing refers to the downhill skiing style using the telemark turn, a technique first developed by Sondre Norheim. Telemark turns are led with the heel flat on the outside ski, while the inside ski is pulled beneath the skier’s body with a flexed knee and raised heel. The skis are staggered but parallel, and 50 to 80 percent of the body weight is distributed over the outer ski depending on snow conditions and terrain.
Telemark skiing can be done with cross country equipment, but specialized telemark boots, bindings and skis allow for higher performance skiing in more difficult conditions. Modern telemark equipment looks similar to alpine ski equipment except that the boots allow the foot to flex in the forefoot, and the bindings allow the heel to rise off the ski.

Telemark skiing is done both in the backcountry and at alpine ski resorts. CANSI telemark instructor certification courses are normally taught at alpine ski resorts and require the use of modern telemark equipment.

Criteria for CANSI Telemark Level I

CERTIFICATION COURSES

Our instructor certification courses follow a “building blocks” approach. Individuals start by taking a Level I course (available to the public) and passing the course evaluation criteria before they can progress to the next level. The information below outlines each course, the course prerequisites and area of focus as well as information on why people take the course. More extensive overviews of our higher-level courses are provided for members in the members area.

CROSS COUNTRY

Prerequisite : Open to the public

Focus: To teach basic skills to beginner to intermediate skiers.

Why People Take This Course: To become a ski instructor and for personal skill development. To learn basic approaches to teach beginner skiers.

Techniques Covered: Diagonal Stride, Double Pole, One Skate, Wedge Turn.

LEVEL II

Prerequisite: XC Level l

Focus: To develop core skills of an Intermediate skier.

Why people take this course: For personal challenge and skill development.
To develop stronger skill analysis and teaching approaches. Required to assist on Level I courses. 

Techniques Covered: Diagonal Stride, Double Pole, One Step Double Pole, Two Skate, Offset Skate, Wedge to Parallel Turns, Step Turn.

LEVEL III

Prerequisite: XC Level ll

Focus: To refine the core skills of intermediate to advanced skiers.

Why people take this course: To strengthen their own skiing skills.

To gain stronger skill analysis skills & drills for advanced skiers.
Required to assist on Level II – III courses, examine on Level I – II courses or conduct refresher courses (after fulfilling course conductor training & approval).

Techniques Covered: Diagonal Stride, One Step Double Pole, One Skate, Two Skate, Offset Skate, Half Skate, Diagonal Skate, Parallel, Wedge to Telemark.

LEVEL IV

Prerequisite: XC Level lll and Telemark Level I or CSIA Level 1

Focus: To refine core skills of advanced and performance skiers.

Why people take this course: To strengthen their own skiing skills.
To gain stronger skill analysis skills & drills for advanced skiers. 

Required to assist on Level IV courses or examine on Level III – IV courses (after fulfilling course conductor training & approval).

Techniques Covered: Diagonal Stride C/W Lane Change, One Step Double Pole, Classic Transitions, One Skate, Two Skate, Offset Skate, Half Skate, Skate Transitions, Tuck Turn in Tracks, Parallel Telemark, Step Turn.

TELEMARK

Prerequisite: Open to the public.

Focus: To teach basic skills to beginner to intermediate skiers.

Why People Take This Course: To become a ski instructor.
For personal skill development.
To learn basic approach to teach beginners.
Required to assist on Level I courses.

Techniques. Covered: Basic Telemark, Intermediate Telemark, Parallel Telemark.

LEVEL II

Pre-requisite: Telemark Level I

Focus: To develop core skills of an Intermediate skier.

Why People Take This Course: For personal challenge and skill development.
To develop stronger skill analysis and teaching approaches.
Required to assist on Level II courses, examine on Level I – II courses or conduct refresher courses (after fulfilling course conductor training & approval)

Techniques Covered: Basic Telemark, Intermediate Telemark, Parallel Telemark, Short Radius Telemark, Free Run Telemark, Wedge Turn, Basic Christie, Parallel Christie.

LEVEL III

Pre-requisite: Telemark Level ll & CSIA Level I

Focus: To refine the core skills of intermediate to advanced Skiers.

Why People Take This Course: To strengthen their own skiing skills.
To gain stronger skill analysis skills & drills for advanced skiers.
Required to assist on Level III courses or examine on Level III courses (after fulfilling course conductor training & approval).

Techniques Covered: Parallel Telemark, Short Radius Telemark Steep Telemark, Carving Telemark, Free Run Telemark, Wedge Turn, Parallel Christie, Short Radius Parallel, Steep Parallel, Free Run Parallel.

Upcoming Courses: Level l

Open To the Public